Technology – keeping people connected during COVID-19


In last week’s blog post, we looked at how technology is enabling the care sector. The second in our series of technology related posts, this week we look at technology – keeping people connected during COVID-19.According to industry leaders, one of the greatest things to come out of the COVID-19 pandemic within the care sector is how it has embraced technology.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed how technology is being used to improve the quality of care provided, and during the pandemic it’s also being used as an imperative tool to keep people connected.

A lot of people who require care and support – whether that be care home residents, support for people in their own homes, retirement communities or other types of care settings, care providers have been using smart phones, computers and tablets to enable residents to communicate with staff, families/friends and with each other via video chat, contact carers, watch television shows and movies, access important information and receive calendar reminders of care visits and medication.

COVID-19 has had a huge impact, keeping many away from family and friends for almost three months. We have seen technology step in to keep people connected to help combat some of the feelings of loneliness, anxiety and isolation. Although this does not replace the need for human contact, the use of technology has had a positive impact on people’s lives.  Care providers have also used technology to give reassurance to families – often far away from their loved ones, giving them some degree of comfort and peace of mind at a time when personal contact has not been possible.

As the restrictions to lockdown are lifted and more people are able to meet in person with friends and family, there is going to be a greater need for care providers and the people they support to continue to find innovative ways to connect and meet, and technology still has a vital role to play in making this possible.

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